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A millennial got dumped and hundreds cheered her up by sharing how they found love after 30

A lot of emotions rise to the surface after being dumped. It can leave a person feeling sad, lonely, confused, rejected and left with a sense that you’ll never find anyone again. People tend to think, “If that person couldn’t stick it out with me, then who will?”

However, most of the time, it’s irrational worry. There are more than a few billion people on the planet to choose from, you just gotta put yourself out there. But that’s a hard thing to hear when your feelings are still raw.

A recent study reported by The New York Times found that today, the old “plenty of fish in the sea” cliche is growing truer by the day. We are nearing a point where there will be more unmarried adults in the U.S. than those who have tied the knot.

In 2019, the share of American adults who were neither married nor living with a significant other had risen to 38%. So good news for you single folks, the dating pool just keeps getting deeper.

Two years ago, Kelsey Huse, a software engineer from Austin, Texas, broke up with her boyfriend and at the age of 30, felt like she was never going to meet anyone again. “My bf broke up with me this week and I just wanna hear happy stories of ppl who found their partner in their 30s thanks,” she tweeted.

My bf broke up with me this week and I just wanna hear happy stories of ppl who found their partner in their 30s thanks

— Kelsey Huse (@Kelsey Huse)
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Huse received an avalanche of responses from people who shared pictures and stories about how they met their special people in their 30s and later, giving her plenty of hope for the future. Her tweet went mega-viral earning nearly 7,000 retweets and 150,000 likes.

Here are some of the best responses.

I strongly believe getting married in your 20s should be illegal. Sort of kidding, but I met my husband at 32 at a funeral. We make each other laugh just by being ourselves. He is the kindest person I know.

We celebrated our 13 year wedding anniversary this year. pic.twitter.com/2A8iNU04VU

— Mona Holmes (@monaeatsLA) November 29, 2020

I met my wife in my 30’s and we got married in our 40’s. Love her. pic.twitter.com/RNpgayDtmn

— 🌈Dr. Frizzle (@Swilua) November 30, 2020

Today I turned 39, and 6 months ago I fell head over heels in love… Last night he proposed. I’m happier than I ever believed I would or even could be in life…
Your bf may have broken up with you, but you’ve got your whole life to go be happy! I wish you the best! pic.twitter.com/3Fsfqamvf3

— Monica S. Blake-Beasley (@TheRealMSBlake) November 29, 2020

Swiped right almost 5 years ago. He lived 3 miles away. Married w a 7 mo old now. 30s are when you figure out what you really need in a partner. pic.twitter.com/aqvGZ6mqBw

— shelbyq (@shelbyq) November 30, 2020

31, joyously single (glory in it!) and back in my hometown for the holidays when I ran into a longtime (8yrs) friend at a pub. Within an hour we were holding hands under the table. Changed everything. He was RIGHT THERE ALL ALONG like some deranged Netflix Christmas movie. pic.twitter.com/kgvWqppr9E

— 🥩 Himbo Discourse 🥩 (@internetmaggie) November 29, 2020

I hit 30, realized career + life I had developed in Vegas (entertainment PR) was not going to support my long term goals. Took a major leap of faith, left everything I knew to return to Iowa. Met my husband 3 months later. Had first babe this year at 37! AND still love my job! pic.twitter.com/84HYy4wxYM

— Alison Cate (@alisonem) November 30, 2020

i found the love of my life when i was 52. we just got married this summer. don’t quit before the miracle. i love you @SavetheKales pic.twitter.com/6DTGCV1oIZ

— barb morrison 🏳️‍⚧️ (@barbmorrison) November 30, 2020

I met my partner in my thirties. He was NOT what I was expecting and really showed I had been going for the wrong things. We were supposed to get married today, but then covid…. It’ll happen. For me and you. pic.twitter.com/pWaxQkLavR

— Kyle Demes (@kyledemes) November 29, 2020

I was 34.. Broke up with my ex a couple months before we were to go on a Euro vacation. Went alone but a friend of mine joined me for the NYE portion of the trip.. man, this dude put on all the moves, confessed his love and boom.. married for 7 years! pic.twitter.com/AWzbbcoA1K

— LABellatini (@LABellatini) November 29, 2020

I met my husband via @bumble when I was 27. He had a photo of his mom and grandma on his profile so I knew he cherished family and the women in his life. We got married in September. 😍 pic.twitter.com/E0LjaWCcBE

— Danielle Desir Corbett (@thethoughtcard) November 29, 2020

Huse couldn’t believe the incredible responses she received and they really did lift her spirits.

I have never received this much engagement on a tweet before. I’m overwhelmed by everyone’s kindness and stories. Thank you all so so much!!!!! 💜💖💜💖

— Kelsey Huse (@kelseyhuse30) November 28, 2020

😳 this tweet reached so many people! I want to say thank you again. I was feeling really sad, and needed reassurance that I would find love again. 😞

— Kelsey Huse (@kelseyhuse30) November 30, 2020

I have amazing friends who love me and I am taking care of myself and working on myself. Whether I am single, or find romantic love again, I am full of love 💛💛

— Kelsey Huse (@kelseyhuse30) November 30, 2020

Huse may not have known it at the time, but breaking up at 30 may have been a blessing in disguise. Studies show that people who get married later in life have better mental health than those who get hitched at a younger age.

According to family ecology researcher Matt Johnson, those who married at the same age as or later than their peers reported higher levels of happiness and self-esteem—and less depression—than those who married early.

“People who marry early tend not to get as much education, have kids earlier than is optimal, and as a result get locked into careers they hadn’t aspired to. In mid-life they’re a little more depressed—or have a lower sense of self-worth—not because they violated some societal norm, but because they started down the path to family life early,” Johnson said.

Huse’s story shows that there is no time frame for love and that it’s possible to find the perfect person well after the age of 30. It also shows that even though Twitter gets a deserved bad rap for being a pretty hostile environment, every once in a while people come together to do something beautiful.

Source: Upworthy
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