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Unprecedented drought reveals 7500-year-old Spanish Stonehenge

Just as multiple pyramids are scattered across the continents, another wonder of the world has found its duplicate.

Behold: Spanish Stonehenge.

The megalithic structure located in the Valdecañas reservoir of Spain owes its reemergence to Europe’s severe drought continuing to drastically reduce water levels. However, this is not its first surprise appearance.

The Dolmen of Guadalperal (the site’s official name) was first discovered in 1926 by German archaeologist Hugo Obermaier. According to Reuters, Obermaier’s find was deliberately flooded for a rural development project nearly 40 years later. Since then it has peaked up from its watery grave a total of four times. It last reappeared during another time of drought in 2019.

Like its Celtic predecessor, the origins of Spanish Stonehenge are shrouded in mystery.

As a video from Good Morning America explains below, the formation of 150 standing stones dates back to 3000 BC, though its creators are unknown. What it was used for is anyone’s guess—some theories suggest it was a sacred tomb, others claim it to be a solar temple.

As Europe endures months of its worst drought in 500 years, other bygone relics have risen up from the water’s descending surface. On Aug 19, Reuters reported that 20 sunken Nazi warships from World War II were visible along the Danube River in Serbia. An ancient bridge not seen since the 1950s also reemerged in Yorkshire, England.

Of course, Europe isn’t the only area being affected. The same month, a buddhist statue thought to be 600 years old appeared in China’s dwindling Yangtze River. Even Texas’ Dinosaur Valley State Park uncovered rare dinosaur tracks previously hidden beneath layers of water and sediment.

While it’s fun marveling at the historical spectacle, hopefully these discoveries from the past can also serve as warnings for the future in an effort to help limit climate change. Even the greatest stone monuments can be rebuilt. The same cannot necessarily be said for our planet.

Source: Upworthy
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